Community Conversation: How can we honour the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation?

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This past year, September 30th was officially named the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. While recognized as a federal statutory holiday throughout Canada, it remains a workday for provinces including Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and Manitoba. There is much debate on how this day should be commemorated. Should workers be provided with time off to commemorate, learn, and unlearn about Indigenous history? Or will people use their paid time off to rest and disengage? For workers who are unable to get paid time off, how can they commemorate this important day if they must work?

On Thursday, October 28th, from 7-8:15pm over Zoom, attendees joined us for Community Conversation: How can we honour the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, with moderator Craig Pearson (Managing Editor at the Windsor Star) and panelists Leila Paugh (Member of CUPE Ontario’s Indigenous Council & Equality Officer at CUPE Local 911), David Pitawanakwat (President of the Shkawbewisag Student Law Society at the University of Windsor), and Elysha Bear-Morin (Member of the Shkawbewisag Student Law Society at the University of Windsor).
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